As described in a previous post, I’m working my way around Kent’s libraries. Today we stayed relatively close to home, as we explored the Gravesend/Gravesham area, visiting 6 libraries of similar age, but each with different characters.

Higham library

higham-forblog

First stop was Higham, where a friend’s daughter is doing some voluntary work. As we arrived, the Saturday board games club was in full swing, with Izzy fully involved. There is a lovely courtyard garden outside the library, and evidence of local skilled craftspeople, as the library has a couple of beautifully worked wall hangings on display. The one below celebrates their connection with Dickens (whose house was at Gad’s Hill – actually closer to Higham than Rochester – who usually trumpet him as their own!)

higham-quilt-forblog

Coldharbour library

One of the larger ones we visited, this library is situated next to a health centre. At one end is a large children’s area, and all around there are lots of book related quotes on the walls. There is a separate section for older children, with computer, desks and comfy seats, plus a colourful stained glass window.

coldharbour-forblog

Also, to the left of the library is a small building – not sure whether it is a garage for a mobile, or just a storage shed, but it has appropriate graffiti decoration – credited to the Coldharbour Crew: Free books, Free ideas!

coldharbour-graffiti

Dashwood library

Next stop was Dashwood library – which wins the prize for the tiniest building visited so far. It looks not much bigger than a double garage, and unfortunately didn’t open until later that afternoon, so I couldn’t go in – but there was a small window in the door so I could see that inside it is completely lined with bookshelves, brightly painted and looks welcoming. Its situated at the edge of a park, which was busy on a Saturday morning with football practice. Apparently (we heard from a library worker we spoke with later) there used to be a nursery over the road, which brought in lots of extra visitors.

dashwood-forblog

Kings Farm library

This library is on the Kings Farm estate – next to a building bearing a carved sign: ‘Estate Office’. The estate was apparently mostly built in the 1920s, but has been substantially rebuilt/refurbished over the last 20 years. If you google the estate, you only get bad news stories,  but the library was bright and welcoming inside, with a colourful children’s section, and customers using the computers

kingsfarm-forblog

Marling Cross library

Penultimate stop was Marling Cross library – another that unfortunately wasn’t due to open until after lunch, but through the huge glass windows, looks modern and tidy. Posters advertised a diverse number of groups meet there, from code club, to mums and toddlers, to knit and natter. It is another that was part of a row of shops, and it’s next to a doctor’s surgery.

marlingcross-3-forblog

Riverview Park library

riverview-forblog2

Last stop for today, we called in to Riverview Park. This hexagonal library was opened in 1964. It is situated next to a row of shops, by a reasonable sized carpark – and apparently (according to a bronze plaque on the wall) on the site of the old Gravesend airfield. Inside, the shelving echoes the unusual shape and peaked roof, with wooden peaks above each bay. In the centre of the building is the old mainmast of a Thames sailing barge.

riverview-forblog1

And we did borrow some books from this library – after a slight confusion, as my Medway card should be valid, but the library manager got some slightly odd messages as she put the books through. And another thing we learned, as another borrower went to take out a book, the computer beeped and alerted her to the fact she had borrowed it before. A good tip – and she went back to choose something else. Apparently the self service machines don’t do that – something to look into perhaps?!

All the photos I’ve taken to date of libraries run by Kent County Council are in this album. Still some way to go!

 

Original source – Julia’s Blog

Comments closed